Advertisement

Enacting Exploratory Practice Principles: Mentoring Language Teaching Professionals

  • Wayne Trotman
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter outlines how five language teachers working on the prep’ year in a state university in Turkey were supervised as they carried out Exploratory Practice (EP). The supervisor was interested in the extent to which they would adhere to the seven principles of EP whilst doing so. He was also keen to ensure research engagement took place bearing in mind the principles concerning ethical procedures outlined in Kubanyiova (The Cambridge guide to research in language teaching and learning. Cambridge University Press, 2015). The studies chose to focus on the following classroom aspects: student motivation, teacher error-correction, teacher talking time and issuing classroom instructions. The chapter links the outcome of the EP case studies to Allwright’s (Research and practice in language teacher education: Voices from the field. University of Minnesota, 2001) conceptual overview and analysis of the three major processes of teacher development: reflective practice, action research and EP.

Keywords

Mentoring Interviews Case study Research ethics Action research Exploratory Practice 

References

  1. Allwright, D. (2001). Three major processes of teacher development and the design criteria for developing and using them. In B. Johnston & S. Irujo (Eds.), Research and practice in language teacher education: Voices from the field (pp. 115–133). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota.Google Scholar
  2. Allwright, D. (2003). Exploratory Practice: Rethinking practitioner research in language teaching. Language Teaching Research, 7(2), 113–141.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Allwright, D. (2005). Developing principles for practitioner research. The case of Exploratory Practice. The Modern Language Journal, 89(3), 353–366.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Allwright, D. (2015). Putting ‘understanding’ first in practitioner research. In K. Dikilitaş, R. Smith, & W. Trotman (Eds.), Teacher-researchers in action (pp. 19–36). Faversham: IATEFL. Retrieved from http://resig.weebly.com/teacher-researchers-in-action.htmlGoogle Scholar
  5. Allwright, D., & Hanks, J. (2009). The developing language learner: An introduction to Exploratory Practice. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Borg, S. (2003). Teacher cognition in language teaching: A review of research on what language teachers think, know, believe, and do. Language Teaching Research, 36(2), 81–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Borg, S. (2013). Teacher research in language teaching: A critical analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Borg, S. (2015). Teacher research. In J. Dean Brown & C. Coombe (Eds.), The Cambridge guide to research in language teaching and learning. Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Burns, A. (2005). Action research: An evolving paradigm? Language Teaching, 38(1). Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Dar, Y. (2015). Exploratory Practice: Investigating my own classroom pedagogy. In D. Bullock & R. Smith (Eds.), Teachers research! (pp. 51–56). Faversham: IATEFL Research Special Interest Group. Retrieved from http://resig.weebly.com/teachers-research.htmlGoogle Scholar
  11. Dikilitaş, K., Smith, R., & Trotman, W. (2015). Teacher-researchers in action. UK: IATEFL Re-SIG Publication.Google Scholar
  12. Dörnyei, Z. (2007). Research methods in applied linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Guillemin, M., & Gillam, L. (2004). Ethics, reflexivity and “ethically important moments” in research. Qualitative Inquiry, 10, 261–280.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Hanks, J. (2015a). ‘Education is not just teaching’: Learner thoughts on Exploratory Practice. ELT Journal, 69(2), 117–128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Hanks, J. (2015b). Language teachers making sense of Exploratory Practice. Language Teaching Research., 19(5), 612–633.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Hanks, J. (2016). What might research AS practice look like? In K. Dikilitaş, M. Wyatt, J. Hanks, & D. Bullock (Eds.), Teachers engaging in research (pp. 19–29). Faversham: IATEFL. Retrieved from http://resig.weebly.com/teachers-engaging-in-research.htmlGoogle Scholar
  17. Hanks, J. (2017). Exploratory Practice in language teaching: Puzzling about principles and practices. London: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Kubanyiova, M. (2015). Ethics in research. In J. Dean Brown & C. Coombe (Eds.), The Cambridge guide to research in language teaching and learning. Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Miller, I. K., Cortes, T. C. R., de Oliveira, A. F. A., & Braga, W. (2015). Exploratory Practice in initial teacher education: Working collaboratively for understandings. In D. Bullock & R. Smith (Eds.), Teachers research! (pp. 65–72). Faversham: IATEFL Research Special Interest Group. Retrieved from http://resig.weebly.com/teachers-research.htmlGoogle Scholar
  20. Ortega, L. (2012). Epistemological diversity and moral ends of research in instructed SLA. Language Teaching Research, 16(2), 206–266.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Richards, K. (2003). Qualitative inquiry in TESOL. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Scrivener, J. (2012). Classroom management techniques. Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Slimani-Rolls, A., & Kiely, R. (2014). ‘We are the change that we seek’: Developing teachers’ understanding of their classroom practice. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 51(4), 425–435.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Stake, R. E. (2003). Case studies. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), Strategies of qualitative inquiry. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Ltd.Google Scholar
  25. Trotman, W. (2010). Teacher oral feedback on student writing: An action research approach towards teacher-student conferences on EFL academic essay writing in a higher education context in Turkey. Unpublished Ph.D.Google Scholar
  26. Trotman, W. (2015a). Reflective peer observation accounts: What do they reveal? In A. Howard & H. Donaghue (Eds.), Teacher evaluation in second language education. London: Bloomsbury Academic.Google Scholar
  27. Trotman, W. (2015b). Researching the researchers. In K. Dikilitaş, R. Smith, & W. Trotman (Eds.), Teacher researchers in action. IATEFL Research SIG Publication.Google Scholar
  28. Trotman, W. (2016). ‘Where have all the students gone?’ A case study of absenteeism in a Turkish State University English Language Preparatory Year. Asian Education Studies, 1(1). July Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Tudor, I. (2001). The dynamics of the language classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Tudor, I. (2003). Learning to live with complexity: Towards an ecological perspective on language teaching. System, 31, 1–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. van Lier, L. (2013). Control and initiative: The dynamics of agency in the language classroom. In J. Arnold & T. Murphey (Eds.), Meaningful action: Earl Stevick’s influence on language teaching (pp. 241–251). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  32. Walsh, S. (2011). Exploring classroom discourse: Language in action. London: Routledge.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wayne Trotman
    • 1
  1. 1.Izmir Katip Çelebi UniversityIzmirTurkey

Personalised recommendations