The Nixon Administration, the New Age and European Integration

  • Joseph M. Siracusa
  • Hang Thi Thuy Nguyen
Chapter

Abstract

Siracusa and Nguyen closely examine changes in world affairs during 1960 and 1974. They show that the world was entering a New Age which was characterized by US economic recession, emergence of Western Europe, an international monetary crisis, and relaxation in international relations. Confronting swift changes in the international environment, the Nixon administration reconsidered its economic, monetary, and political policies and this somehow led to new elements in its policy design towards European integration. This was reflected in President Nixon’s new policy which put an end to the Bretton Woods system and his policy to reduce tensions with the Soviet Union and open up to China. Siracusa and Nguyen convincingly argue that with a realist view of the world order, President Nixon downgraded the European integration process in his foreign policy agenda, and that his focus was to respond to the perceived US economic and political decline and to protect US strategic interests.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph M. Siracusa
    • 1
  • Hang Thi Thuy Nguyen
    • 2
  1. 1.Royal Melbourne Institute of TechnologyMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Diplomatic Academy of VietnamHanoiVietnam

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