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Fundamentals of Becoming a Safe and Independent Surgeon (From First Assistant to Skilled Educator)

  • Nabeel R. Obeid
  • Konstantinos Spaniolas
Chapter

Abstract

General surgery residency training, governed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in collaboration with the American Board of Surgery (ABS), continues to evolve to meet the needs of the present-day healthcare climate and to address specific areas of deficiency so that graduating surgeons can be competent and proficient. Despite these efforts, the transition to independent surgical practice is difficult from a personal and professional perspective due to newfound operative autonomy and practice management. Key principles can be applied to alleviate these challenges and include formal transition to practice programs, finding a valuable mentor, setting up for early success by taking on low-complexity cases, developing collaborative relationships, and adhering to society guidelines.

Keywords

Safe Independent Surgeon Surgery Outcomes Transition Mentorship Education Training Volume 

Suggested Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SurgeryStony Brook MedicineStony BrookUSA

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