Advertisement

Fundamentals of Operating Room Setup and Surgical Instrumentation

  • Katerina Dukleska
  • Allison A. Aka
  • Adam P. Johnson
  • Karen A. Chojnacki
Chapter

Abstract

The focus of this chapter will be to introduce the general principles of how operating rooms are designed in order to provide surgical interventions that improve patients’ lives. Although the basic operating room design was first heralded in the nineteenth century, today’s advances have introduced complex surgical equipment that necessitates integration in a fixed space. Moreover, in order to be able to effectively and efficiently carry out a surgical procedure, a highly reliable interdisciplinary and integrated team is necessary. This chapter will provide the reader with a basic overview of the operating room, the key players that work in this environment, and the commonly utilized equipment and instruments.

Keywords

Introduction to the operating room Operating room fundamentals Surgical instruments 

Supplementary material

Suggested Readings

  1. Scott-Conner CEH. The Sages manual: fundamentals of laparoscopy, thoracoscopy and GI endoscopy. New York: Springer; 2006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Marks JM, Dunkin B. Principles of flexible endoscopy for surgeons. New York: Springer; 2013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Vilos GA, et al. Laparoscopic entry: a review of techniques, technologies, and complications. J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2007;29(5):433–65.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. ACS. Statement on operating room attire. Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons. 2016.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Kennedy L. Implementing AORN recommended practices for sterile technique. AORN J. 2013;98(1):14–26.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Schulmann K, et al. The patient with multiple intestinal polyps. Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol. 2007;21(3):409–26.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    ACS. Statement on operating room attire. Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons. 2016 [cited 2017 April 17].Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Spruce L, Wood A. Clinical issues – December 2016. AORN J. 2016;104(6):593–600.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Morgenstern L. Harold Hopkins (1918–1995): Let there be light…. Surgical Innov. 2004;11(4):291–2.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Lau WY, Leow CK, Li AKC. History of endoscopic and laparoscopic surgery. World J Surg. 1997;21:444–53.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Mishra RK, Mishra R. Textbook of practical laparoscopic surgery. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers; 2013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Palmer R. Safety in laparoscopy. J Reprod Med. 1974;13(1):1–5.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Hasson HM. A modified instrument and method for laparoscopy. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1971;110(6):886–7.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Vilos GA, et al. Laparoscopic entry: a review of techniques, technologies, and complications. J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2007;29(5):433–65.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Szabó I, László A. Veres needle: in memoriam of the 100th birthday anniversary of Dr János Veres, the inventor. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2004;191(1):352–3.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Scott-Conner CEH. The Sages manual: fundamentals of laparoscopy, thoracoscopy and GI endoscopy. New York: Springer; 2006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Marks JM, Dunkin B. Principles of flexible endoscopy for surgeons. New York: Springer; 2013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katerina Dukleska
    • 1
  • Allison A. Aka
    • 1
  • Adam P. Johnson
    • 1
  • Karen A. Chojnacki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgerySidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

Personalised recommendations