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Psychoanalytic Treatment of Borderline Patients in a Day Hospital Setting

  • Heinz Weiss
  • Margerete Schött
Chapter

Abstract

The authors present the relevance of day hospital settings for the psychoanalytic treatment of borderline patients. Referring to specific areas of conflict which are central to borderline pathology (identity problems, dealing with separation and dependency, claustro-agoraphobic anxieties, taking refuge to ‘psychic retreats’), they argue that the specific elements of a day hospital setting may be more favourable in dealing with these problems than a classical psychiatric inpatient treatment. Using clinical vignettes, the significance of focusing on the emotional experiences in the here and now of the interactions, maintaining the borders of the setting and the thorough working through of the transference and countertransference is emphasised. Possibilities and limits of day hospital care are discussed with reference to the existing literature and future research strategies.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Robert-Bosch-Krankenhaus, Abt. Psychosomatische MedizinStuttgartGermany
  2. 2.Sigmund-Freud-InstitutFrankfurtGermany

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