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Anesthesiology pp 827-844 | Cite as

Anesthesia for Weight Reduction Surgery

  • Angelo Andonakakis
  • Kathleen Kwiatt
Chapter

Abstract

Obesity is a growing problem in the United States, affecting over a third of the adult population. Excess body weight has implications for nearly every organ system, increasing the risk of life-altering comorbidities including heart disease, respiratory dysfunction, diabetes, cancer, and musculoskeletal injury. Bariatric surgery offers patients surgical rearrangement of the gastrointestinal tract, causing caloric malabsorption, restriction, or both. Patients lose more weight, sustain greater weight loss, and experience better comorbidity reduction compared to medical management. The anesthesia team plays a critical role in achieving successful perioperative outcomes. Understanding the technical surgical approaches allows one to facilitate the procedure and anticipate complications. Special attention to airway management, cardiopulmonary physiology of obesity, and patient positioning mitigates the risks of anesthesia in the obese. Thorough knowledge of pharmacology and its application to the obese is critical to appropriately apply total, lean, or ideal body-weight calculations and achieve therapeutic drug levels. By learning the advances in surgical technique and appreciating the perioperative implications of obesity, one can effectively coordinate with the surgical team and contribute to successful perioperative outcomes.

Keywords

Obesity Bariatric surgery Pharmacology of obesity Pathophysiology of obesity 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angelo Andonakakis
    • 1
  • Kathleen Kwiatt
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiologyCooper University HospitalCamdenUSA

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