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Psychosomatic and Person-Centered Medicine

  • Juan E. Mezzich
  • Ihsan M. Salloum
Chapter
Part of the Integrating Psychiatry and Primary Care book series (IPPC)

Abstract

Psychosomatics involves an important approach to medical care that is connected to a holistic theoretical perspective as well as a practical guide to clinical work. To this effect, this paper briefly reviews psychosomatics within the framework of holistic theory and care, which happens to be one of the key concepts of person-centered medicine (PCM). Next, the paper considers the basic notions of person-centered medicine and the way this has evolved historically from ancient civilizations through modern medicine. The conceptualization of PCM is further approached from a systematic study organized by the International College of Person Centered Medicine. After that, the paper focuses on person-centered psychiatry in general and then more specifically on person-centered diagnosis both as a theoretical model and as a practical guide.

Keywords

Psychosomatic approach Person-centered medicine Person-centered psychiatry health care Health Wholeness Holistic framework Person-centered diagnosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juan E. Mezzich
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ihsan M. Salloum
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Section on Classification, Diagnostic Assessment and Nomenclature, World Psychiatric AssociationNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Section on Classification, Diagnostic Assessment and Nomenclature, World Psychiatric AssociationMiamiUSA
  4. 4.University of Miami Miller School of MedicineMiamiUSA

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