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The Global Canopy: Propagating Discipline-Based Global Mobility

  • Patricia McLaughlinEmail author
  • James Baglin
  • Andrea Chester
  • Peter Davis
  • Swapan Saha
  • Anthony Mills
  • Philip Poronnik
  • Tina Hinton
  • Justine Lawson
  • Roger Hadgraft
Chapter

Abstract

As Australian universities welcome significant numbers of inbound international students and increasingly encourage outbound domestic student mobility, the opportunities for global discipline connectedness, cross-cultural understandings, and fertile learning interactions abound. Yet these two “strands” of students rarely engage in deliberately organized discipline-based activities. They are passing “as ships in the night,” with opportunities for long-term relationships, improved discipline-based networks, and global mobility opportunities unrealized or operating coincidently at the margins of their curriculum. This chapter reports upon the outcomes of a range of approaches to discipline-based teaching and learning between these two cohorts at Australian universities, which illustrate how separate cohorts of inbound and outbound students can interrelate to build discipline-based competencies for navigating tomorrow’s world.

Keywords

Global learning Lifelong learning Student mobility 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia McLaughlin
    • 1
    Email author
  • James Baglin
    • 1
  • Andrea Chester
    • 1
  • Peter Davis
    • 2
  • Swapan Saha
    • 3
  • Anthony Mills
    • 4
  • Philip Poronnik
    • 5
  • Tina Hinton
    • 5
  • Justine Lawson
    • 6
  • Roger Hadgraft
    • 6
  1. 1.RMIT UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.University of NewcastleNewcastleAustralia
  3. 3.Western Sydney UniversitySydneyAustralia
  4. 4.Deakin UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  5. 5.The University of SydneySydneyAustralia
  6. 6.University of Technology SydneyUltimoAustralia

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