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Evaluating Smart Urban Freight Solutions Using Microsimulation

  • Ioannis KarakikesEmail author
  • Lambros Mitropoulos
  • Mihails Savrasovs
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems book series (LNNS, volume 36)

Abstract

Last mile distribution remains a difficult-to-solve variable in urban congestion’s equation, especially in Europe, due to increased population, economic growth and limited space. Over the last decades, several European projects have contributed significantly into that direction, by developing innovative concepts (e.g., electric solutions, ITS adoption, effective policy-based strategies). A great number of measures has been deployed and considered as possible solutions to the last mile distribution problem of European cities, however, only a few of them have actually been implemented and tested over a long period of time and their impacts have been quantified.

This study focuses on the evaluation of three smart urban freight transport measures on an urban interchange – Commercial port – by using a microscopic traffic simulation tool in order to decide which is the most effective in environmental and transportation terms. Each measure is being evaluated as if it was to be implemented now (2017) and in 2030 in order to assess measures’ effectiveness in the short as well in the long term. The analysis is completed by using a multi-criteria multi-stakeholder decision making tool to generate the Logistics Sustainability Index (LSI) for each measure, to summarize results and provide a sustainability based rating to support local decision-making.

Keywords

City logistics Evaluation Micro simulation Logistics Sustainability Index 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work has been supported by the ALLIANCE project (http://alliance-project.eu/) and has been funded within the European Commission’s H2020 Programme under contract number 692426. This paper expresses the opinions of the authors and not necessarily those of the European Commission. The European Commission is not liable for any use that may be made of the information contained in this paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ioannis Karakikes
    • 1
    Email author
  • Lambros Mitropoulos
    • 1
  • Mihails Savrasovs
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringUniversity of ThessalyVolosGreece
  2. 2.Transport and Telecommunication InstituteRigaLatvia

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