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Trading Zones and Moral Imagination as Ways of Preventing Normalized Deviance

  • Michael E. Gorman
Chapter
Part of the Issues in Business Ethics book series (IBET, volume 47)

Abstract

Normalized deviance occurs when a dysfunctional pattern of behavior becomes normal practice in an organization. Examples in this chapter include NASA’s space shuttle program, the collapse of Enron and the bursting of the housing bubble in Ireland. Moral imagination involves getting participants in these situations to see that their practices are based on mental models that can be changed. One of the sparks for change is encountering an alternative mental model. A trading zone among business decision-makers, customers, stakeholders and possibly even an ethicist could make differences among mental models clear and lead to new possibilities for action.

Keywords

Normalized deviance Moral imagination Mental models Trading zones Enron Irish banking collapse NASA space shuttle 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael E. Gorman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Engineering & Society, School of Engineering & Applied ScienceUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

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