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Gridlock in Washington

  • Michael Haas
Chapter

Abstract

Although the American Constitution was designed for a certain amount of gridlock, with the expectation that negotiations would reach consensus, the present situation is rooted in a variety of issues. Diverse cultural orientations, fear of increasing ethnic diversity, legislators who do not respond to public needs, deliberately organized low voter turnout, a power structure that maintains dominance through huge financial campaign contributions, oligarchic pressure groups, a covert four-party system masquerading as a two-party system, the media no longer performing the task of informing the public politically, a gridlocked Congress, presidents unprepared for governance, and courts operating for the benefit of the rich and to the detriment of the poor. As a result, Donald Trump won support by stating the thesis of the Mass Society Paradigm. While he has opted for the path toward totalitarian control, the same gridlock has resisted him.

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© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Haas
    • 1
  1. 1.Los AngelesUSA

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