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Sustainable Mealworm Production for Feed and Food

  • Lars-Henrik Heckmann
  • Jonas Lembcke Andersen
  • Natasja Gianotten
  • Margje Calis
  • Christian Holst Fischer
  • Hans Calis
Chapter

Abstract

Sustainable production broadly covers three main pillars: the environmental, economic and social pillars. Much emphasis has been put on the environmental sustainability of insect production, highlighting the great potential of this new type of production as compared to conventional livestock production regarding its reduced impact on the environment and the climate. This chapter will describe some of the efforts that have been conducted and are on-going in recent R&D collaborations on making mealworm production more economically sustainable; focusing on the utilization of low-cost by-products in composite diets designed for mealworms. Other areas of importance for cost-effective production such as automation will also be presented briefly.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We gratefully acknowledge the financial support for the SUSMEAL project from the Eurostars program with co-funding from Innovation Fund Denmark (IFD), Netherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO) and the EU Commission; and for the INBIOM project from the Danish Agency for Science and Higher Education under the Innovation Network for Biomass (INBIOM). Finally, we thank the reviewers for their valuable comments on the manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lars-Henrik Heckmann
    • 1
  • Jonas Lembcke Andersen
    • 1
  • Natasja Gianotten
    • 2
  • Margje Calis
    • 2
  • Christian Holst Fischer
    • 1
  • Hans Calis
    • 2
  1. 1.Danish Technological Institute, Life ScienceAarhusDenmark
  2. 2.Proti-Farm R&DErmeloThe Netherlands

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