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Bark and Butterflies: Redeeming the Past—Digital Interventions into Post-Memory

  • Adrian Palka
Chapter

Abstract

In 2013, a team of artist researchers from Coventry University undertook a field trip to Siberia, following in the footsteps of an inherited wartime diary, back to the Gulag where the author’s Polish father and grandfather had been exiled in 1940. This chapter outlines the artistic aims and processes of this expedition and their manifestation in the multimedia installation Bark and Butterflies. It also offers reflections on the personal motivations behind the expedition and their possible wider cultural relevance, referring to Hirsch’s notion of ‘post-memory’ (Hirsch, The Generation of Post Memory: Writing and Visual Culture After the Holocaust. New York: Columbia University Press, 2012). At the core of this enquiry lie issues around the possible aesthetic strategies taken by second-generation artists, who engage with inherited, traumatic, wartime stories and the use of digital technologies in rendering them.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adrian Palka
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Media and Performing ArtsCoventry UniversityCoventryUK

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