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Rebuilding Healthy Sexual Lifestyles for Trafficking Survivors

  • Rachel Needle
  • Elizabeth Bessette
Chapter

Abstract

The complexity of an individual’s sexuality is difficult to define. Individuals subscribe to messages given to us by our political, religious, cultural, or familial views, which mold and shape our sexuality and the ways in which it defines us. Those who have been forced into the modern-day slavery of sex trafficking endure shame, ostracism, violence, and manipulation. Often times the implications of these acts of slavery manifest both physically and mentally. This chapter reviews research on and discusses the impact of sex trafficking on an individual’s mind, body, and sexuality while shedding light on the manipulative and destructive patterns of those who lure women and men into sex trafficking. The implications of such a practice on therapy goals and interventions will be discussed to facilitate treatment that addresses sexual, psychological, and physiological challenges that the client will face.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rachel Needle
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Bessette
    • 1
  1. 1.Whole Health Psychological CenterWest Palm BeachUSA

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