Advertisement

What Factors Determine the International Circulation of Scholarly Books? The Example of Translations Between English and French in the Era of Globalization

  • Gisèle Sapiro
Chapter
Part of the Socio-Historical Studies of the Social and Human Sciences book series (SHSSHS)

Abstract

The international circulation of ideas depends on a series of social factors and on the action of intermediaries, as Bourdieu pointed out. The circulation of scholarly books in translation offers a relevant site of observation of intellectual exchanges across cultures. What academic books are translated and why? This paper proposes a general framework of factors determining the translation of scholarly books and of the circulation channels. Six sets of factors are analyzed: power relations between languages and cultures, symbolic capital and other properties of the author (gender, academic position, social capital), properties of the book (content, form, length, “packaging”), symbolic capital of the publisher(s), editorial and academic networks (social capital), private and public funding (economic capital). Some of them are specific to this category of books, others are characteristic of upmarket translations, others derive more generally from the power relations structuring the global book market. This framework is grounded in an empirical study of the cross-circulation of scholarly books between French and English in the era of globalization, mixing quantitative and qualitative methods. In this period, the United States became hegemonic in many domains, including the book market, a process which started in the 1970s, while the French hegemony declined, without however losing its symbolic capital in the area of the social sciences and humanities.

Keywords

Translation Circulation of ideas Intellectual exchanges Scholarly publishing World book market Symbolic capital Field theory Social sciences and humanities Sociology of translation Sociology of publishing 

References

  1. Bourdieu, Pierre. 1988. Homo Academicus. Trans. Peter Collier. London: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  2. ———. 1993. Some Properties of Fields. In Sociology in Question(s), 72–77. Trans. Richard Nice. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  3. ———. 1999. The Social Conditions of the International Circulation of Ideas. In Bourdieu: A Critical Reader, ed. Richard Shusterman, 220–228. Oxford-Malden: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
  4. ———. 2008. A Conservative Revolution in Publishing. Translation Studies 1 (2): 123–153.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. ———. 2013. Séminaires sur le concept de champ, 1972–1975. Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales 200: 4–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Brahimi, Mohammed Amine, and Fordant, Clarisse. 2017. The Controversial Receptions of Edward Said. A Sociological Analysis of Scientific Citations. Sociologica 1. [Online. https://doi.org/10.2383/86981].
  7. Brissaud, Constantin, and Jean-Michel Chahsiche. 2017. How to Become an International Intellectual? Thomas Piketty and Capital in the Twenty-First Century. Sociologica 1. [Online. https://doi.org/10.2383/86982].
  8. Brisson, Thomas. Forthcoming. Can the Subaltern Speak (in French)? The Reception of Gayatri Spivak in France. In Ideas on the Move. The International Circulation of Paradigms and Theories in the Social Sciences and Humanities, ed. Gisèle Sapiro, Marco Santoro, and Patrick Baert. London: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  9. Chenu, Alain. 2001. U.S. Sociology Through the Mirror of French Translation. Current Sociology 30 (2): 105–109.Google Scholar
  10. Cusset, François. 2003. French Theory: Foucault, Deleuze, Derrida et Cie et les mutations de la vie intellectuelle aux États-Unis. Paris: La Découverte.Google Scholar
  11. Dumont, Lucile. 2017. The Moving Frontiers of Intellectual Work: The Academic Reception of Roland Barthes’ Works in the United States (1960s–1980s). Sociologica 1. [Online. https://doi.org/10.2383/86984].
  12. Frisani, Marcella. 2014. Au marché des idées. Les enjeux de la traduction du livre savant au Royaume-Uni. In Le livre français aux États-Unis, au Royaume-Uni et en Argentine, ed. Gisèle Sapiro, 52–91. Paris: Institut français/CESSP. Online. http://www.institutfrancais.com/fr/actualites/traduction-sciences-humaines
  13. Gingras, Yves. 2002. Les formes spécifiques de l’internationalité du champ scientifique. Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales 141–142: 31–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Hauchecorne, Mathieu. 2012. Une réception politisée. La traduction de John Rawls et de la philosophie politique et morale anglophone en français. In Traduire la littérature et les sciences humaines: conditions et obstacles, ed. Gisèle Sapiro, 343–368. Paris: DEPS.Google Scholar
  15. Heilbron, Johan. 1999. Towards a Sociology of Translation: Book Translations as a Cultural World System. European Journal of Social Theory 2 (4): 429–444.Google Scholar
  16. ———. 2015. French Sociology. Ithaca: Cornell.Google Scholar
  17. Heilbron, Johan, and Gisèle Sapiro. 2007. Towards a Sociology of Translation: Current Issues and Future Prospects. In Constructing a Sociology of Translation, ed. Michaela Wolf and Alexandra Fukari, 93–108. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Lamont, Michele. 1987. How to Become a Dominant French Philosopher: The Case of Jacques Derrida. American Journal of Sociology 93 (3): 584–622.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. McCoy, Jill. 2014. The Derrida Translation Seminars Project. 80 ans de Derrida. In Sciences humaines en traduction. Le livre français aux États-Unis, au Royaume-Uni et en Argentine, ed. Gisèle Sapiro, 175–202. Paris: Institut français/CESSP. [Online].Google Scholar
  20. Noël, Sophie. 2012. L’engagement par la traduction. Le rôle des petits éditeurs dans l’importation des ouvrages de sciences humaines et sociales. In Traduire la littérature et les sciences humaines. Conditions et obstacles, ed. Gisèle Sapiro, 273–293. Paris: La Documentation française.Google Scholar
  21. Pudal, Romain. 2004. La difficile réception de la philosophie analytique en France. Revue d’Histoire des Sciences Humaines 2 (11): 69–100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. ———. 2012. La philosophie peut-elle être américaine? Les obstacles à l’importation du pragmatisme en France. In Traduire la littérature et les sciences humaines: conditions et obstacles, ed. Gisèle Sapiro, 321–342. Paris: DEPS.Google Scholar
  23. Santoro, Marco, and Sapiro, Gisèle. 2017. On the Social Life of Ideas and the Persistence of the Author in the Social and Human Sciences. Sociologica 1. [Online. https://doi.org/10.2383/86980].
  24. Sapiro, Gisèle, ed. 2008. Translatio: Le marché de la traduction en France à l’heure de la mondialisation. Paris: CNRS Éditions.Google Scholar
  25. ———. 2010. Globalization and Cultural Diversity in the Book Market: The Case of Translations in the US and in France. Poetics 38 (4): 419–439.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. ———, ed. 2012. Traduire la littérature et les sciences humaines: conditions et obstacles. Paris: DEPS.Google Scholar
  27. ———. 2014a. The International Career of Distinction. In The Routledge Companion to Bourdieu’s Distinction, ed. Philippe Coulangeon and Julien Duval, 29–42. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  28. ———. 2014b. Quoi de neuf après la French Theory? Les traductions sur le marché du livre académique aux États-Unis. In Sciences humaines en traduction. Le livre français aux États-Unis, au Royaume-Uni et en Argentine, ed. Gisèle Sapiro, 14–51. Paris: Institut français/CESSP. [Online].Google Scholar
  29. ———, ed. 2014c. Sciences humaines en traduction. Le livre français aux États-Unis, au Royaume-Uni et en Argentine. Paris: Institut français/CESSP. [Online. http://www.institutfrancais.com/fr/actualites/traduction-sciences-humaines].Google Scholar
  30. ———. 2015. Translation and Symbolic Capital in the Era of Globalization: French Literature in the United States. Cultural Sociology 9 (3): 320–346.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Sapiro, Gisèle, and Mauricio Bustamante. 2009. Translation as a Measure of International Consecration. Mapping the World Distribution of Bourdieu’s Books in Translation. Sociologica 2–3. [Online. https://doi.org/10.2383/31374].
  32. Sapiro, Gisèle, and Lucile Dumont. 2016. La diffusion internationale du structuralisme: entre appropriation et rejet. In Résonances des structuralismes, ed. Jean-François Bert and Jérôme Lamy, 123–138. Paris: Éditions des archives contemporaines.Google Scholar
  33. Sapiro, Gisèle, and Ioana Popa. 2008. Traduire les sciences humaines et sociales. In Translatio. Le marché de la traduction en France à l’heure de la mondialisation, ed. Gisèle Sapiro, 107–138. Paris: CNRS Editions.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Sapiro, Gisèle, Marco Santoro, and Patrick Baert, eds. 2017. Ideas on the Move. The International Circulation of Paradigms and Theories in the Social Sciences and Humanities. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  35. Sapiro, Gisèle, Eric Brun, and Clarisse Fordant. Forthcoming. The Rise of the Social Sciences and Humanities in France: Institutionalization, Professionalization and Autonomization, (avec Eric Brun et Clarisse Fordant). In Institutionalization of the Social Sciences and Humanities in Europe and Beyond, ed. Christian Fleck, Victor Karady, and Matthias Duller. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  36. Schiffrin, André. 2000. The Business of Books. New York: Verso.Google Scholar
  37. Seiler-Juilleret, Hélène. 2014. Le point de vue français. Obstacles et stratégies de contournement. In Sciences humaines en traduction. Le livre français aux États-Unis, au Royaume-Uni et en Argentine, ed. Gisèle Sapiro, 119–157. Paris: Institut français/CESSP. [Online].Google Scholar
  38. Sorá, Gustavo, Alejandro Dujovne, and Heber Ostroviesky. 2014. Structure, histoire et horizons de la traduction d’auteurs français de sciences sociales et humaines en Argentine. In Sciences humaines en traduction. Le livre français aux États-Unis, au Royaume-Uni et en Argentine, ed. Gisèle Sapiro, 92–118. Paris: Institut français/CESSP. [Online].Google Scholar
  39. Thompson, John. 2005. Books in the Digital Age: The Transformation of Academic and Higher Education Publishing in Britain and the United States. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gisèle Sapiro
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre Européen de Sociologie et de Science Politique (CESSP)CNRS-Ecole des Hautes Études en Sciences SocialesParisFrance

Personalised recommendations