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Handling of Race Cars

  • Massimo GuiggianiEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Limited slip differential and wings are typical of race cars. Both greatly impact on the vehicle handling (otherwise would not be used). Therefore, the first part of this Chapter is devoted to the formulation of a suitable vehicle model, which, in this case, cannot be single track. As a matter of fact, there is a strong interaction between lateral and longitudinal forces. The concept of handling diagram becomes inadequate and must be replaced by the handling surface. This fairly new tool is introduced in the framework of handling of road cars with locked or limited-slip differential, The handling of Formula cars is first addressed by means of the handling surface. However, an even more powerful description is given by means of the Map of Achievable Performance (MAP). With this new approach it is possible to better understand the effects of different vehicle set-ups at steady state and also in power-on/off conditions.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e IndustrialeUniversità di PisaPisaItaly

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