Challenge Based Learning: The Case of Sustainable Development Engineering at the Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico City Campus

  • Jorge Membrillo-Hernández
  • Miguel de J. Ramírez-Cadena
  • Carlos Caballero-Valdés
  • Ricardo Ganem-Corvera
  • Rogelio Bustamante-Bello
  • José Antonio Benjamín-Ordoñez
  • Hugo Elizalde-Siller
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 715)

Abstract

Recently, The Tecnológico de Monterrey (ITESM) in Mexico has launched the Tec21 Educational Model. It is a flexible model in its curriculum that promotes student participation in challenging and interactive learning experiences. At the undergraduate level, one of the central scopes of this model is addressing challenges by the student, to develop disciplinary and cross-disciplinary skills. Two institutional strategies have been implemented to reach the ultimate goal of the ITESM, to work in all careers under the Challenge Based Learning (CBL) system: the innovation week (i-week) and the innovation semester (i-semester). Here we report on the results of four i-week and one i-semester models implemented in 2016. The i-semester was carried out in conjunction with a training partner, the worldwide leader Pharmaceutical Company Boehringer Ingelheim. Thirteen Sustainable Development Engineering career students were immersed for a 14 week period into the strategies to solve real-life challenges in order to develop the contents of four different courses. Six teachers of the academic institution and four engineers from the Boehringer plant served as mentors. Continuous evaluations were carried out throughout the abilities examination and partial and final examinations were performed by both experts, from the company and from the University.

Keywords

Challenge based education Sustainable development  Engineering 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank all the members of the Mechatronics and Sustainable Development Staff at Teconologico de Monterrey, CCM for helpful discussions and to Dr. Ricardo Swain-Oropeza for his support throughout this experience.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jorge Membrillo-Hernández
    • 1
  • Miguel de J. Ramírez-Cadena
    • 1
  • Carlos Caballero-Valdés
    • 1
  • Ricardo Ganem-Corvera
    • 1
  • Rogelio Bustamante-Bello
    • 1
  • José Antonio Benjamín-Ordoñez
    • 1
  • Hugo Elizalde-Siller
    • 1
  1. 1.Escuela de Ingeniería y CienciasTecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Ciudad de MéxicoTlalpan, Mexico CityMexico

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