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Looking Forward: The Future of Financial Counseling

  • Angela K. Mazzolini
  • Bryan Ashton
  • Rebecca Wiggins
  • Vicki Jacobson
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter takes a look at some of the challenges and potential solutions a financial counselor might face during their practice and work with clients, such as meeting the needs of all types of clients, assessment, and evaluation, and choosing an appropriate professional designation. A financial counselor’s knowledge of counseling theory and evidence-based practices, including counseling models and frameworks to implement into counseling practice is equally as important as financial knowledge to demonstrate financial counselor competency. In addition, this chapter focuses on the future of the financial counseling profession through defining clear professional pathways and professional development, and through continued collaboration with other related professions and fields. The chapter concludes with a call to action for all financial counselors.

Keywords

Future Vision Call to action Regulation Evaluation Assessment Professional development Millennials Advocate 

Supplementary material

431699_1_En_14_MOESM1_ESM.docx (17 kb)
Supplementary Data 1 (DOCX 16 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angela K. Mazzolini
    • 1
  • Bryan Ashton
    • 2
  • Rebecca Wiggins
    • 3
  • Vicki Jacobson
    • 4
  1. 1.Financial Counseling ConsultantLubbockUSA
  2. 2.Trellis CompanyAustinUSA
  3. 3.Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education®WestervilleUSA
  4. 4.Center for Excellence in Financial CounselingUniversity of Missouri-St. LouisSt. LouisUSA

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