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Quantum Gravity: A Dogma of Unification?

  • Kian Salimkhani
Chapter
Part of the European Studies in Philosophy of Science book series (ESPS, volume 9)

Abstract

The quest for a theory of quantum gravity is usually understood to be driven by philosophical assumptions external to physics proper. It is suspected that specifically approaches in the context of particle physics are rather based on metaphysical premises than experimental data or physical arguments. I disagree. In this paper, I argue that the quest for a theory of quantum gravity sets an important example of physics’ internal unificatory practice. It is exactly Weinberg’s and others’ particle physics stance that reveals the issue of quantum gravity as a genuine physical problem arising within the framework of quantum field theory.

Keywords

Principle of equivalence Unification Quantum field theory Quantum gravity General relativity Graviton/spin-2 particle Lorentz-invariance 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for PhilosophyUniversity of BonnBonnGermany

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