Advertisement

Food for a Common(s) Curriculum: Learning to Recognize and Resist Food Enclosures

  • John J. Lupinacci
  • Alison Happel-Parkins
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter we discuss a case study from Detroit, Michigan, that highlights what educators can learn from community efforts to address food insecurity. Advocating that educators and policy makers rethink how they recognize and come to understand food enclosures—socio-political and economic arrangements that limit access to the production, preparation, and consumption of local, healthy, and culturally relevant food—the chapter emphasizes the importance of working together to learn from and with food movements.

References

  1. Abbott, S. (2014). Hidden curriculum. The glossary of education reform. Retrieved from http://edglossary.org/hidden-curriculum
  2. Avey, T. (2015). The history of school lunch. Public Broadcasting Network (PBS). Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/food/the-history-kitchen/history-school-lunch/
  3. Bowers, C. A. (2006). Revitalizing the commons: Cultural and educational sites of resistance and affirmation. Lanham: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
  4. Bowers, C. A. (2017). Commons. In C. A. Bowers (Ed.), The EcoJustice dictionary. Retrieved from http://www.cabowers.net/dicterm/CAdict003.php
  5. Center for Poverty Research. (2017). Who are the working poor in America? Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Davis: University of California State. Retrieved from https://poverty.ucdavis.edu/faq/who-are-working-poor-america
  6. Centers for Chronic Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2009). The power of prevention chronic disease: The public health challenge of the 21st century. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/pdf/2009-power-of-prevention.pdf
  7. Coleman-Jensen, A., Nord, M., Andrews, M., & Carlson, S. (2012). Household food security in the United States in 2011. Washington, DC: United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).Google Scholar
  8. Coleman-Jensen, A., Nord, M., & Singh, A. (2013). Household food security in the United States in 2012. Washington, DC: United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).Google Scholar
  9. Cordain, L., Boyd Eaton, S., Sebastian, A., Mann, N., Lindeberg, S., Watkins, B. A., O’Keefe, J. H., & Brand-Miller, J. (2005). Origins and evolution of the Western diet: Health implications for the 21st century. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 81(2), 341–335.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Detroit Black Community Food Security Network (DBCFSN). (2016a). Our mission, vision, and values. Detroit. Retrieved from https://detroitblackfoodsecurity.org/aboutus/vision-values1/#1481166384142-8e585330-bbae
  11. Detroit Black Community Food Security Network (DBCFSN). (2016b). Educational & youth programs. Detroit. Retrieved from https://detroitblackfoodsecurity.org/educational-youth-programs/
  12. FAO, WFP, & IFAD. (2012). The state of food insecurity in the world 2012: Economic growth is necessary but not sufficient to accelerate reduction of hunger and malnutrition. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO).Google Scholar
  13. Giroux, H. (1992). Border crossings: Cultural workers and the politics of education. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  14. Guthman, J. (2011). Weighing in: Obesity, food justice, and the limits of capitalism. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  15. Illich, I., & Verne, E. (1976). Imprisoned in the global classroom. New York: Writers and Readers.Google Scholar
  16. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). (2015). Climate change 2014: Synthesis report. Geneva: IPCC. Retrieved from http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessment-report/ar5/wg2/ar5_wgII_spm_en.pdf
  17. Johnson, D. B., Podrabsky, M., Rocha, A., & Otten, J. J. (2016). Effect of the healthy hunger-free kids act on the nutritional quality of meals selected by students and school lunch participation rates. JAMA Pediatrics. Retrieved from http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/2478057
  18. Krugman, P. (2008, February 18). Poverty is poison. The New York Times. Retrieved from: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/18/opinion/18krugman.htm
  19. Lupinacci, J., & Happel-Parkins, A. (2015). Recognize, resist, and reconstitute: An ecocritical framework in teacher education. The SoJo Journal: Educational Foundations and Social Justice Education, 1(1), 45–61.Google Scholar
  20. Lupinacci, J., & Happel-Parkins, A. (2017). Ecocritically (re)considering STEM: Integrated ecological inquiry in teacher education. Issues in Teacher Education, 26(3), 52–64.Google Scholar
  21. Martusewicz, R., Edmundson, J., & Lupinacci, J. (2011). EcoJustice education: Toward diverse, democratic, and sustainable communities. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  22. Martusewicz, R., Edmundson, J., & Lupinacci, J. (2015). EcoJustice education: Toward diverse, democratic, and sustainable communities (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  23. McKenna, M., & Brodovsky, S. (2016). School food and nutrition policies as tools for learning. In J. Sumner (Ed.), Learning, food, & sustainability: Sites for resistance and change (pp. 201–220). New York: Palgrave.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. MG Research & Consulting. (2007). Examining the impact of food deserts on public health in Detroit. Retrieved from http://marigallagher.com/projects/
  25. Monteiro, C. A. (2009). Nutrition and health. The issue is not food, nor nutrients, so much as processing. Public Health Nutrition, 12(5), 729.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. National Education Association (NEA). (2017). Child nutrition. Issues and action. Retrieved from http://www.nea.org/home/38649.htm
  27. Niewolny, K. L., & D’Adamo-Damery, P. (2016). Learning through story as political praxis: The role of narratives in community food work. In J. Sumner (Ed.), Learning, food, & sustainability: Sites for resistance and change (pp. 113–132). New York: Palgrave.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Nyéléni. (2007). Declaration of Nyéléni. Sélingué: Nyéléni.Google Scholar
  29. Russell, R. B. (2014). Richard B. Russell national school lunch act. U.S. Government. Retrieved from https://www.fns.usda.gov/sites/default/files/NSLA.pdf
  30. Seligman, H. K., Laraia, B. A., & Kushel, M. B. (2011). Food insecurity is associated with chronic disease among low-income NHANES participants. The Journal of Nutrition, 140, 304–310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Spring, J. (2015). Globalization of education: An introduction. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  32. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2016). A profile of the working poor, 2014. BLS report 1060. Retrieved from https://www.bls.gov/opub/reports/working-poor/2014/home.htm
  33. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). (2016). Definitions of food security. Economic Research Service. Retrieved from https://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/food-nutrition-assistance/food-security-in-the-us/definitions-of-food-security/
  34. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). (2017a). Press release: Ag secretary Perdue moves to make school meals great again. Press releases. Retrieved from https://www.usda.gov/media/press-releases/2017/05/01/ag-secretary-perdue-moves-make-school-meals-great-again
  35. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). (2017b). Healthy hunger-free kids act. Food and Nutrition Service. Retrieved from https://www.fns.usda.gov/tags/healthy-hunger-free-kids-act-0
  36. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). (2017c). School meals: Healthy hunger-free kids act. Food and Nutrition Service. Retrieved from https://www.fns.usda.gov/school-meals/healthy-hunger-free-kids-act
  37. United Nations. (1948). Universal declaration of human rights text of the declaration. United Nations Publications. Retrieved from the United Nations website. http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/
  38. United Nations. (1966). International convention on economic, social, and cultural rights. United Nations Publications. Retrieved from the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights website. http://www2.ohchr.org/english/law/pdf/cescr.pdf
  39. United Nations. (1989). Convention on the rights of the child. United Nations Publications. Retrieved from the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights website. http://www2.ohchr.org/english/law/pdf/crc.pdf
  40. Weaver-Hightower, M. B. (2011). Why education researchers should take school food seriously. Educational Researcher, 40(1), 15–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Yakini, M. [Sun Rhythms]. (2011, October 9). System change – Malik Yakini [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NG3T3B0M0iE

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • John J. Lupinacci
    • 1
  • Alison Happel-Parkins
    • 2
  1. 1.Washington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  2. 2.University of MemphisMemphisUSA

Personalised recommendations