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Convergence and Cooperation in Social Responsibility in Health

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Part of the Advancing Global Bioethics book series (AGBIO, volume 9)

Abstract

Global health has been defined as the area of study, research, and practice that places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide. Despite the efforts of achieving equity, global health is characterized by disparities that have led to some discussion about who is responsible for providing healthcare. The UNESCO Chair of Bioethics and Human Rights has provided a necessary space for reflection to address the dilemmas of resource allocation, global health, and social responsibility using Article 14 as a guideline and starting from a global bioethics framework. This essay explores the relationship between global health and social responsibility and their link to global bioethics, arguing that the approach of global bioethics based on rights and responsibilities is an important tool to achieve convergence and cooperation regarding social responsibility and health, because it offers proper venues for dialogue and understanding.

Keywords

Global health Global bioethics Social responsibility Convergence Cooperation 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UNESCO Chair in Bioethics and Human RightsRomeItaly
  2. 2.MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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