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Planning for City Sustainability: GreenWorks Orlando Case Study

  • Christopher V. Hawkins
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, we examine GreenWorks Orlando. GreenWorks Orlando is an overarching planning and organizational framework established by the City of Orlando, Florida. The two specific plans developed under the GreenWorks umbrella that are the focus of this case study—the GreenWorks Orlando Community Action Plan and the Orlando Municipal Operations Sustainability Plan—were developed to serve as the foundation for community sustainability. This chapter describes the processes of translating Orlando’s goal of becoming the greenest city in America into these planning initiatives and the implications of these plans on city programmatic efforts that advance the city’s primary sustainability objectives—advancing economic growth in green industries and protecting the environment and curbing greenhouse gas emissions.

Keywords

Local planning Administration and management Sustainability governance 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher V. Hawkins
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public AdministrationUniversity of Central FloridaOrlandoUSA

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