Instrumentation

Chapter

Abstract

Dermatoscopy (or dermoscopy) allows a noninvasive, magnified, in vivo visualization of microstructures of the skin not visible to the naked eye. The most used device to perform a dermatoscopy examination is the handheld dermatoscope, which may be equipped with polarized and/or non-polarized light; in the last case, the application of a liquid (oil, alcohol, water) between the magnifying lens and the skin, which decreases light reflection, refraction, and diffraction, is generally required for a better visualization of epidermal and dermal structures (“epiluminescence” microscopy). This basic equipment may be broadened by computer-assisted digital systems supplied with lenses achieving higher magnifications, up to ×1000. Such devices, called videodermatoscopes, are also suited for image storing and processing.

Keywords

Dermatoscopy Dermoscopy Polarized light Epiluminescence microscopy Videodermatoscopy 

References

  1. 1.
    Tanaka M (2006) Dermoscopy. J Dermatol 33(8):513–517CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Campos-do-Carmo G, Ramos-e-Silva M (2008) Dermoscopy: basic concepts. Int J Dermatol 47(7):712–719CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Fleming MG (2001) Digital dermoscopy. Dermatol Clin 19(2):359–367, ix.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Rubegni P, Burroni M, Dell’Eva G, Andreassi L (2002) Digital dermoscopy analysis for automated diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions. Clin Dermatol 20(3):309–312CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Rajpara SM, Botello AP, Townend J, Ormerod AD (2009) Systematic review of dermoscopy and digital dermoscopy/artificial intelligence for the diagnosis of melanoma. Br J Dermatol 161(3):591–604CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Verzì AE, Lacarrubba F, Micali G (2016) Use of low-cost videomicroscopy versus standard videodermatoscopy in trichoscopy: a controlled, blinded noninferiority trial. Skin Appendage Disord 1(4):172–174CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Micali G, Lacarrubba F, Verzì AE, Nasca MR (2015) Low-cost equipment for diagnosis and management of endemic scabies outbreaks in underserved populations. Clin Infect Dis 60(2):327–329CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dermatology ClinicUniversity of CataniaCataniaItaly

Personalised recommendations