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Gender Differences in Metabolic Syndrome

  • Yogita Rochlani
  • Gabriela Andries
  • Srikanth Yandrapalli
  • Naga Venkata Pothineni
  • Jawahar L. Mehta
Chapter

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of abnormalities, diagnosed using different combinations of metabolic abnormalities. Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome varies based on age, sex, and geography similar to that of cardiovascular disease. Gender differences in pathophysiology, presentation and diagnosis of cardiovascular disease have been described in the literature, however, data on differences in metabolic syndrome in men and women is scarce. Through this chapter, we aim to discuss that gender differences in prevalence, pathophysiology, implications on cardiovascular disease risk, and management of metabolic syndrome. This knowledge will help further our understanding of the disease process and develop gender specific treatment strategies to help manage metabolic syndrome better and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus.

Keywords

Metabolic syndrome Gender differences in cardiovascular disease Cardiovascular disease in women Gender differences in hypertension Gender differences in hyperlipidemia Obesity Insulin resistance 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yogita Rochlani
    • 1
  • Gabriela Andries
    • 2
  • Srikanth Yandrapalli
    • 2
  • Naga Venkata Pothineni
    • 3
  • Jawahar L. Mehta
    • 4
  1. 1.Division of CardiologyWestchester Medical Center-New York Medical CollegeValhallaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Internal MedicineWestchester Medical Center-New York Medical CollegeValhallaUSA
  3. 3.Division of CardiologyUniversity of Arkansas for Medical SciencesLittle RockUSA
  4. 4.Stebbins Chair in CardiologyUniversity of Arkansasfor Medical SciencesLittle RockUSA

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