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Washback

  • Dawn Karen Booth
Chapter
Part of the English Language Education book series (ELED, volume 12)

Abstract

This chapter introduces and conceptualises the phenomenon known as washback within language testing. In three parts, a review of washback literature begins with an historical overview of the origins of the phenomenon, and traces early hypotheses and models in language testing. Part two of the chapter explores the nature and scope of washback and discusses its many dimensions and relationships to other similar concepts in language testing. Part three then provides a summary of key findings that have emerged from empirical studies that have specifically focused on washback on learning. Findings from these studies guide the central study presented in Chaps.  6,  7 and 8 of this volume and are further discussed in Chaps.  9,  10 and  11.

Keywords

Washback Backwash Impact Consequential validity Washback on learning Dimensions Scope Language testing Literature review Content Strategy use Learner affect English testing English language learning Degree and depth of learning Motivation Attitudes 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dawn Karen Booth
    • 1
  1. 1.AucklandNew Zealand

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