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Breast Cancer

  • Matteo Lambertini
  • Philippe Aftimos
  • Andrea Gombos
  • Ahmad Awada
  • Martine Piccart
Chapter

Abstract

The appropriate selection of medical therapeutic interventions in breast cancer patients is a daily challenge for medical oncologists and takes into account disease characteristics such as stage at diagnosis, age and menopausal status, aggressiveness of the disease, and presence or absence of key therapeutic targets such as hormone receptors and HER2. Knowledge of treatment-related toxicities as well as patient’s comorbidities and preferences is a critical component of an optimal estimation of the benefit versus harm ratio of a specific therapy.

This chapter reviews the side effects of the four main medical treatment modalities for breast cancer: chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, targeted agents, and bone-modifying therapeutics in terms of frequency, monitoring, and practical management.

Keywords

Breast cancer Cytotoxic chemotherapy Endocrine treatment Targeted agents Bone-modifying agents Side effects 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matteo Lambertini
    • 1
  • Philippe Aftimos
    • 1
  • Andrea Gombos
    • 1
  • Ahmad Awada
    • 1
  • Martine Piccart
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MedicineInstitut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de BruxellesBruxellesBelgium

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