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Management of Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

  • Anne P. O’Dea
  • Priyanka Sharma
Chapter

Abstract

Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) which is defined by the lack of expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) and absence of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) overexpression and/or gene amplification accounts for 15–20% of all breast cancers in the United States. TNBC is currently the most lethal subtype of breast cancer and is associated with poor long-term outcomes compared to other breast cancer subtypes. Over the last two decades, institution and/or enhancement of targeted therapies has improved the outcomes of HER2 amplified and hormone receptor-positive breast cancers. However, these recent advances in targeted therapies have evaded TNBC due to its heterogeneity and the lack of defined molecular targets. In this chapter, the diagnosis and clinical behavior of metastatic TNBC, systemic therapy, and the emerging role of newer agents in treatment of metastatic TNBC will be reviewed. Current treatment paradigms for metastatic TNBC will be explored with an emphasis on advances in targeted agents, biologics, and immunotherapy.

Keywords

Metastatic breast cancer Triple-negative breast cancer Systemic therapy Novel agents Brain metastases 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Kansas Medical CenterWestwoodUSA

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