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Narrative Qualities of Design Argumentation

  • Colin M. Gray
Chapter

Abstract

The narrative qualities of a design presentation and subsequent critique comprise a design argument, distilling designers’ rationale for their design, rooted in their process. In this paper, I analyze two consecutive design presentations from an introductory undergraduate human-centered design studio, documenting the argumentation structures students rely upon when “selling” their design. Dominant argumentation structures of these presentation events are described and related to narrative in a human-centered design context.

Keywords

Design argumentation Design education Human-centered design User experience (UX) design Narrative Design process Design presentation 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Purdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

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