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Domestic Noir pp 199-218 | Cite as

Domestic Noir and the US Cozy as Responses to the Threatened Home

  • Diane Waters
  • Heather Worthington
Chapter
Part of the Crime Files book series (CF)

Abstract

Waters and Worthington consider two commercially successful crime fiction subgenres that speak back to Golden Age plot structures and themes: domestic noir and the American cozy, suggesting that both articulate modern anxieties concerning the tensions between individuality, personal space and safety versus conformity and community. Mostly written by and for women, featuring female protagonists, the novels’ focus is on domestic space and domestic life and the issues consequent upon twenty-first-century modes of living that force women out of the home. In their analysis of cozy mysteries and domestic noirs, the authors find contrasting yet connected accounts of female responses to the pressures of modern life.

Works Cited

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diane Waters
    • 1
  • Heather Worthington
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre for Research into Gender and Culture in SocietySwansea UniversitySwanseaUK
  2. 2.University of CardiffCardiffUK

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