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Wartime Expansion of the Nitrogen Industry

  • Anthony S. Travis
Chapter

Abstract

The industry of atmospheric nitrogen has become a German industry, a world problem has been solved, and the most serious War danger of technical character had been prevented.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony S. Travis
    • 1
  1. 1.Sidney M. Edelstein Center for the History and Philosophy of Science, Technology and MedicineThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael

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