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Echocardiography in Trauma

  • Azin Alizadehasl
  • Anita Sadeghpour
Chapter

Abstract

Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, both, have been proposed as methods to monitor volume status and also regional and global systolic function in a wide variety of traumatic settings; and they have proved useful in the immediate assessment of left and right ventricles, both, systolic function, volume status, and detection of significant pericardial, valvular or aortic pathology too.

Based on the mechanism of injury, cardiac trauma can be categorized to the Penetrating and Non penetrating (blunt) trauma. The non penetrating or blunt trauma has replaced the previous term of “cardiac contusion” and which the severity ranges from minor bruises of the myocardial rupture. Blunt chest trauma which portends cardiac injury should be managed appropriately with TEE guide in order to hasten the diagnosis and make it more precise and safe.

Keywords

Transthoracic echocardiography Transesophageal echocardiography Blunt trauma Stab wound Chordal rupture Aortic trauma 

Abbreviations

TAR

Traumatic aortic rupture

TEE

Transesophageal echocardiography

TTE

Trans thoracic echocardiography

Supplementary material

Movie 43.1

Aortic transection in a patient with history of Aortic valve replacement a few years ago and falling down and chest pain from the steps 2 weeks before admission, Parasternal long axis view in TTE shows large echo free space around ascending aorta that flow goes through it via a narrow neck (AVI 7874 kb)

Movie 43.2

Aortic transection in a patient with history of Aortic valve replacement a few years ago and falling down and chest pain from the steps 2 weeks before admission, Parasternal long axis view in TTE shows large echo free space around ascending aorta that flow goes through it via a narrow neck (AVI 2929 kb)

Movie 43.3

Hemo-pericardium and clinically tamponade after cardiac catheterization (AVI 9724 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Azin Alizadehasl
    • 1
  • Anita Sadeghpour
    • 2
  1. 1.Echocardiography and Cardiogenetic Research CentersCardio-Oncology Department, Rajaie Cardiovascular Medical and Research CenterTehranIran
  2. 2.Echocardiography Research Center, Rajaie Cardiovascular Medical and Research CenterIran University of Medical ScienceTehranIran

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