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Grab ‘n’ Drop: User Configurable Toolglasses

  • James R. EaganEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10515)

Abstract

We introduce the grab ‘n’ drop toolglass, an extension of the toolglass bi-manual interaction technique. It enables users to create and configure their own toolglasses from existing user interfaces that were not designed for toolglasses. Users compose their own toolglass interactions at runtime from an application’s user interface elements, bringing interaction closer to the objects of interest in a workspace. Through a proof-of-concept implementation for Mac OS X, we show how grab ‘n’ drop capabilities could be added to existing applications at the toolkit level, without modifying application source code or UI design. Finally, we evaluate the power and flexibility of this approach by applying it to a variety of applications. We further identify limitations and risks associated with this approach and propose changes to existing toolkits to foster such user-reconfigurable interaction.

Keywords

User interfaces Toolglasses Instrumental interaction Polymorphism 

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.LTCI, Télécom ParisTechUniversité Paris-SaclayParisFrance

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