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Vietnam Writings and the National Security State

  • Douglas B. Klusmeyer
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines Morgenthau’s growing opposition to the Vietnam War as part of his broader criticisms of the national security state and the threats it posed to republican constitutional order. In advancing its case for the relevance of Morgenthau’s insights today, the chapter begins by situating several of Morgenthau’s views within contemporary scholarship on the national security state. The next two sections focus on his general critique of American policy in the Vietnam War and the perceived pathologies in the policymaking process. The fourth section shows how Morgenthau’s views converged with Noam Chomsky in several important respects. The fifth section examines his concern over the decline of the ethic of responsibility among policymakers. The final section examines his criticisms of Henry Kissinger’s conduct as statesman.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas B. Klusmeyer
    • 1
  1. 1.American UniversityWashington, DCUSA

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