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Neuromodulator: Cosmetic Botox

  • Shoib MyintEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The desire for flawless skin and the search for the fountain of youth have consumed people since the beginning of time. Some were prepared to do all sorts of wacky things to improve their appearance in the past. In the 1400s, ladies in the French Court of Louis XI ate mostly soup, as they believed chewing gave them wrinkles. In the 1600s, uncooked egg whites were used to glaze the skin, creating a smooth shell that hid wrinkles.

Supplementary material

Video 8.1

Facial cosmetic Botox (MOV 132164 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.OphthalmologyMyint Center for Eye and Facial Plastic Surgery, Nevada Eye Physicians, UNLV School of MedicineHendersonUSA

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