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FirstLife: From Maps to Social Networks and Back

  • Alessio Antonini
  • Guido Boella
  • Alessia Calafiore
  • Vincenzo Mario Bruno Giorgino
Chapter

Abstract

Social network and web sharing sites represent a novel and ever-growing source of information that usually contains geographical information. In this chapter, we first present FirstLife, i.e. a specific social platform that has been recently awarded by a national-level competition in the “Smart Cities and Social Communities” context. FirstLife aims at fostering co-production (in the sense of the Nobel Prize winner Elinor Ostrom) and Do It Yourself initiatives, providing a virtual place connected via maps to the concrete reality. Thus, the platform by itself is intended to involve the different actors in developing new services, from institutions to associations, from citizens to enterprises. We propose a set of methodologies to face such complexity in terms of data management, integration and smart functionalities.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alessio Antonini
    • 1
  • Guido Boella
    • 1
  • Alessia Calafiore
    • 1
  • Vincenzo Mario Bruno Giorgino
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of TorinoTorinoItaly
  2. 2.Department of Economic and Social Sciences, Mathematics and StatisticsUniversity of TorinoTorinoItaly

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