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Rectal Carcinoma: Imaging for Staging

  • Mit Dattani
  • Gina BrownEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Modern day multimodality management of rectal cancer involves a number of treatment options determined by tumour related factors. An accurate and reproducible staging system relies on radiological prognostication to individualise treatment plans. Pre-operative rectal cancer assessment has evolved beyond conventional prognostic features such as depth of tumour invasion, nodal involvement and metastatic spread to tumour threatened resection margins, and extramural vascular invasion. The current imaging modalities available to stage rectal cancer includes endorectal ultrasound scan (ERUS), MRI, computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET). This chapter summarises the evidence base and the utility of the different imaging modalities that underpin the current standards of care in rectal cancer management.

Keywords

Rectal carcinoma Ultrasound MRI Staging TME 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Pelican Cancer FoundationBasingstokeUK
  2. 2.The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Imperial College of LondonLondonUK

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