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Introduction

  • Olivia N. Perlow
  • Durene I. Wheeler
  • Sharon L. Bethea
  • BarBara M. Scott
Chapter

Abstract

This introductory chapter provides readers with the background for understanding contemporary Black women’s liberatory pedagogies. It examines how teaching, in all of its forms, has historically been an integral part of Black women’s struggle for social justice. Black women pedagogues of today join a river of Black foremothers whose pedagogies not only served as resistance to white supremacist and patriarchal domination, but as healing and empowerment particularly for Black community members. Furthermore, this chapter provides important subtext for decolonizing pedagogy. Reclaiming African ancestral ways of knowing and being, this introduction draws on community, collaboration, and consciousness-raising for audiences within the academy and beyond.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olivia N. Perlow
    • 1
  • Durene I. Wheeler
    • 1
  • Sharon L. Bethea
    • 1
  • BarBara M. Scott
    • 1
  1. 1.Northeastern Illinois UniversityChicagoUSA

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