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And Thus We Shall Survive: The Perseverance of the South Side Community Art Center as a Counter-narrative, 1938–1959

  • Debra A. Hardy
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the South Side Community Art Center’s history as a counter-narrative to the dominant historical canon in art education history. First, the theoretical framework created to interpret the history is outlined, focusing on the master narrative in the history of art education and using Critical Race Theory to subvert that narrative. The Center’s origins as part of the Federal Art Project, initial success within the Bronzeville community, and its early struggle from 1940 to 1959 are detailed, focusing on its importance as a long-standing Black arts organization. The Art Center’s story highlights issues faced by Black art institutions to proliferate art education literature, despite its storied past.

Keywords

South Side Community Art Center Federal Art Project Counter-narrative Art education history Chicago 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Debra A. Hardy
    • 1
  1. 1.Independent ScholarAustinUSA

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