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Representations of Whiteness in Finnish Visual Culture

  • Mira Kallio-Tavin
  • Kevin Tavin
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter investigates whiteness in Finland and explores Nordic beliefs and values regarding race and racism against the ideology of Nordic nations as democratic societies. The chapter focuses on troubling normative ideas about Finland and the notion of Finnishness and interrogates how whiteness as property is produced and reproduced through popular visual culture. Contemporary art examples, as forms of visual culture, are explored through their possibilities to engage in a critical conversation on whiteness and ownership. The chapter concludes by tying together questions of possession, property, and ownership in Finland, and the politics of whiteness as the right of representation.

Keywords

Finland Nordic Whiteness Racism Popular visual culture Contemporary art 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mira Kallio-Tavin
    • 1
  • Kevin Tavin
    • 1
  1. 1.Aalto UniversityHelsinkiFinland

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