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Musicking Marginalization: Periphractic Practices in Music Education

  • Juliet Hess
Chapter

Abstract

Employing a critical race theoretical framework, this chapter argues that classroom practices in US music education often relegate participants with non-Eurocentric musical experiences to periphractic space or the margins of school music. This chapter explores validating specific Western musical practices—still physical comportment in listening and performing music, the use of Western standard notation and musical constructs, and the limited use of aurality—as periphractic practices in music education. After exploring practices that often circumscribe students of color to periphractic space, I suggest possible ways music educators can interrupt the Eurocentric ensemble paradigm to recognize students’ own musical enculturation. I draw examples from a multiple case study of four elementary music teachers in Toronto committed to challenging dominant paradigms of music education.

Keywords

Music education Periphractic space Critical race theory Race Western music Whiteness 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juliet Hess
    • 1
  1. 1.College of MusicMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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