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The Emotional Nature of Qualitative Research

  • Angela Stephanie Mazzetti
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter I explore some of the emotional challenges encountered when conducting qualitative research. Throughout the chapter I refer to a carefully selected literature set and qualitative research studies. I also offer some practical guidance to help those engaging in qualitative research.

Keywords

Emotions Rapport Reflection 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angela Stephanie Mazzetti
    • 1
  1. 1.Queen’s University BelfastBelfastUK

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