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Queer Criminology and the Global South: Setting Queer and Southern Criminologies into Dialogue

  • Matthew Ball
  • Angela Dwyer

Abstract

The growth of ‘queer criminology’ in recent years has seen greater attention being paid to the treatment of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people by criminal justice agents and institutions. The foundations of this work remain situated in the global North. The emergence of southern criminology, then, offers important tools to consider the extent that queer criminology mirrors the concerns of the global North, and the implications of this for the global South. This chapter begins drawing together these two fields. It first examines the ways that queer criminology reflects ‘Northern’ LGBT and Queer frameworks. It then explores the implications of transposing initiatives for LGBTQ people in the global North into the South without accounting for differences in these contexts.

Keywords

Queer Criminology Global South Global North Politics LGBTQ 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew Ball
    • 1
  • Angela Dwyer
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Law, School of JusticeQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.School of Social SciencesUniversity of TasmaniaHobartAustralia

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