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Epilogue: Future Directions on Learning Analytics to Enhance Study Success

  • Dana-Kristin Mah
  • Jane Yin-Kim Yau
  • Dirk IfenthalerEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Utilising learning analytics in order to enhance study success is an emerging topic in higher education. Empirical evidence is still scarce, even though some higher education institutions already implemented learning analytics systems and reported positive impacts on student retention. This edited volume captures many current research and practical experiences on learning analytics in the field of higher education regarding theoretical perspectives linking learning analytics and study success, technological innovations for supporting student learning, issues and challenges for implementing learning analytics at higher education institutions, as well as case studies showcasing successfully implemented learning analytics strategies at higher education institutions. This epilogue presents an analysis of the previous chapters with a focus on four majors themes that have emerged: (1) acceptance and competence for the implementation of learning analytics, (2) personalised learning and early interventions, (3) data privacy and ethics, and (4) technical considerations. In conclusion, future directions on learning analytics for enhancing study success are presented.

Keywords

Student success Implementation Personalised learning Data privacy and ethics 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dana-Kristin Mah
    • 1
  • Jane Yin-Kim Yau
    • 1
  • Dirk Ifenthaler
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.University of MannheimMannheimGermany
  2. 2.Curtin UniversityPerthAustralia

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