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Using Learning Analytics to Examine Relationships Between Learners’ Usage Data with Their Profiles and Perceptions: A Case Study of a MOOC Designed for Working Professionals

  • Min LiuEmail author
  • Wenting Zou
  • Chenglu Li
  • Yi Shi
  • Zilong Pan
  • Xin Pan
Chapter

Abstract

In this study, we investigated how participants in a MOOC designed for working professionals interacted with various key course components of the MOOC (e.g., discussion forums, readings, videos, quizzes, optional resources) and the usage patterns connected to participants’ profiles and perceptions. The results showed an overall declining trend of usage across all interaction events, which are aligned with previous studies. Major decline occurred in the first 2 weeks of the MOOC, suggesting that early interventions are crucial to enhance retention. One important finding was that extrinsic motivation may influence MOOC learners’ engagement in terms of participation in discussion forums for courses related to professional development. Therefore, course designers and instructors should consider providing some interventions or incentives to motivate participants to continue. Findings are discussed.

Keywords

MOOCs Learning analytics Online teaching and learning Instructional design 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Min Liu
    • 1
    Email author
  • Wenting Zou
    • 1
  • Chenglu Li
    • 1
  • Yi Shi
    • 1
  • Zilong Pan
    • 1
  • Xin Pan
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA

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