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Targeted Therapy in Management of Endometrial Cancer

  • Yeh Chen LeeEmail author
  • Stephanie Lheureux
  • Mansoor Raza Mirza
  • Amit M. Oza
Chapter

Abstract

Since 1983, endometrial cancer (EC) has been classified using Bokhman’s dualistic model [1] based on clinicopathological characteristics. Type I EC, with endometrioid histology representing up to 80% of the cases, is associated with endometrial hyperplasia secondary to estrogenic stimulation. This estrogen-related pathway in EC is typically low-grade cancers and expresses hormone-receptors, which can be leveraged therapeutically. Type II EC consists of the estrogen-independent non-endometroid carcinomas such as serous, clear cell, carcinosarcoma, mucinous adenocarcinoma, and squamous-cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma histology.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yeh Chen Lee
    • 1
    Email author
  • Stephanie Lheureux
    • 2
  • Mansoor Raza Mirza
    • 3
  • Amit M. Oza
    • 4
  1. 1.Gynecology and Drug Development ProgramPrincess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Gynecology and Drug Development ProgramUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Department of OncologyRigshospitalet, Copenhagen University HospitalCopenhagenDenmark
  4. 4.Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of TorontoTorontoCanada

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