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Understanding Business–Government Relations in China: Changes, Causes and Consequences

  • Xiaoke Zhang
  • Tianbiao Zhu
Chapter
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

The introductory chapter sets the general backdrop against which the central analytical objectives of the book are defined and its major contributions to theoretical and policy debates specified. It introduces a typology of business–government relations, advances the main causal propositions of changes and variations in business–state interactions, and explores the impact of such interactions on the emergence of new market institutions. It does so by drawing on, but not confining itself to, empirical evidence presented in individual contributions to the book. It concludes by discussing the implications of the major findings of the book for future research on business, government and institutional change in China, other transitional economies and beyond.

Keywords

China Business–government relations Global and normative pressures Sociopolitical transformations State ideologies and institutions Market structures 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiaoke Zhang
    • 1
  • Tianbiao Zhu
    • 2
  1. 1.Alliance Manchester Business SchoolUniversity of ManchesterManchesterUK
  2. 2.Institute for Advanced Study in Humanities and Social SciencesZhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina

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