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Investigating Assessment Literacy in Tunisia: The Case of EFL University Writing Teachers

  • Moez Athimni
Chapter

Abstract

Assessment is one of the regular tasks that teachers perform at all educational levels. However, teachers’ knowledge about assessment or ‘assessment literacy’ has often been described as below the assessment practices recommended in the testing literature (e.g., Popham, Assessment literacy for teachers: Faddish or fundamental? Theory into Practice, 48, 4–11, 2009; Volante & Fazio, Exploring teacher candidates’ assessment literacy: Implications for teacher education reform and professional development. Canadian Journal of Education, 30, 749, 2007). The present chapter explores Tunisian university EFL writing teachers’ assessment literacy by investigating the way they perform their regular testing tasks. Data were collected using an open-ended questionnaire administered to a group of EFL writing teachers from different higher education institutions in Tunisia. Results showed that most teachers did not receive any training in language testing as part of their university courses or during their professional development programmes. Results also showed that despite their ability to perform certain assessment tasks, the teachers seemed to have limited knowledge especially about aspects related to test construction.

Keywords

Writing Assessment literacy Assessment competencies Tunisia EFL teaching 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Moez Athimni
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of English Language and LinguisticsThe Higher Institute of Languages of Tunis (ISLT)TunisTunisia

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