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Negotiating Difference and Cohabitation: Global Refugees in a German Village

  • Anne Sophie Krossa
Chapter
Part of the Europe in a Global Context book series (EGC)

Abstract

It is widely accepted that the global impacts on the local, permeating and changing it over a long period. Currently, it seems that it is the growing perception of difference and inequality that increases pressure on social constellations. How do we deal with this increased pressure? It certainly does not suffice to say we are different, and that is why we belong together.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne Sophie Krossa
    • 1
  1. 1.Katholische Hochschule MainzMainzGermany

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