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Women Heads of State and Government

  • Farida Jalalzai
Chapter
Part of the Gender and Politics book series (GAP)

Abstract

This chapter first provides a rationale for focusing more on women presidents and prime ministers given the current state of the gender and politics literature. It then presents trends related to women’s executive office holding such as the quantities of women leaders, paths and positions. An assessment of the potential impacts women presidents and prime ministers exert on women as a group follows. I argue that women executives further women’s political empowerment within the society as a whole and even on a global scale, through mechanisms related to their roles as policy makers, selectors, and symbols. I conclude by highlighting a number of opportunities for future research on measuring the political empowerment hastened by women executives.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Farida Jalalzai
    • 1
  1. 1.Oklahoma State UniversityStillwaterUSA

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