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Introduction

  • Michael D. Beevers
Chapter

Abstract

Beevers introduces a novel argument to explain why natural resource governance often fails or is unsatisfactory after conflicts end. Using Liberia and Sierra Leone as case studies, the chapter draws attention to an international policy agenda that promoted securitization and marketization of natural resources. Beevers explores the consequences of these policies and concludes that a skewed agenda has been ineffective and had detrimental effects on the ground. It explains how despite helping to end the worst of the resource plunder, securitization and marketization are recreating the historical conditions that led to the conflict, exacerbating new tensions around environment and land, and raising expectations. The introduction concludes by suggesting that dominant narratives about the links between natural resources, armed conflict and peace influenced international interventions.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael D. Beevers
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental StudiesDickinson CollegeCarlisleUSA

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